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Mini Pressure Converter/Boost sensor replacement

Mini Pressure Converter/Boost sensor replacement

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Old 12-15-2017, 06:13 PM
jeffd1
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2010 Mini r56 Pressure Converter/Boost sensor replacement

I wanted to post some instructions on how to replace a pressure converter aka boost sensor. The car was making the classic moo/buzzing/kazoo sound as I shut it off. A quick google search turned up many results saying to replace the pressure converter. I was not able to find decent instructions on how to actually get this sensor off, specifically how this sensor attaches to the car. After spending a few hours figuring it out, I decided I would post what I learned.

Locating it from underneath:

The best access is probably to take the air intake manifold off, but that was not something I wanted to attempt. I saw a video where someone gained access from under the car. I jacked up the car and attempted this. The part is difficult to find. It is located behind the engine, under the air intake manifold. If you are lying under the car get your head to the back firewall and look up just to the passenger side of the exhaust pipe. It is a pretty far reach up from the ground. It is just to the passenger side and above the starter solenoid (a small silver cylinder). The original part is partially milky/yellow/white plastic. That's probably the easiest way to identify it.

Locating it from above:
From under the car I was able to get a hand on it and wiggle it around. However, not understanding how the bracket worked, I could not figure out how to get it off. So I tried to get access from the top. I took off the air filter and the tubing around it. I figured out that I could see it by looking through a hole in the center of the air intake manifold (after pushing a tube aside with a screwdriver).

How it attaches to the car:

There is a large rubber block that goes around the whole part. The block has a small hole at the top of it, and a metal blade that is attached to the car goes through this hole to hold it in place. To take it off push the part towards the driver side. It takes a little bit of force, but it should slide right out.

Disconnecting the tubing and wiring:

Just twist and pull off the tubes. The electrical has a lever that needs to be pried up with a fingernail as you pull the connector off. Very difficult to do with one hand under the car. It was helpful to have someone above and someone below (but that requires taking the air filter and tubing off).

Installing the new part:

Take the rubber off of the old part and put it on the new part. Then connect the tubes and electrical connector. Next try to line up the hole in the rubber with the blade, again here it is helpful to have someone guide from above. Slide it on and your done.
 

Last edited by jeffd1; 12-16-2017 at 01:49 PM.
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Old 12-15-2017, 11:42 PM
squawSkiBum
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Welcome to NAM and thanks for the post!

What model/year? Any pictures to add?
 
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Old 12-16-2017, 06:29 AM
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Changed mine last month along with new vacuum lines. Fun job if you don't have the car on a lift, about two hours.
 

Last edited by S-2013; 12-16-2017 at 06:30 AM. Reason: imoji
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Old 12-16-2017, 12:00 PM
jeffd1
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The car is a 2010 mini hatchback r56 turbo.

I didn't take great pics, but this might help a little. You can see the grey rubber sleeve that goes around the part. There is a slot in this rubber (not in the pic) that a metal blade goes through.
 
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Old 04-01-2018, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by jeffd1 View Post
I wanted to post some instructions on how to replace a pressure converter aka boost sensor. The car was making the classic moo/buzzing/kazoo sound as I shut it off. A quick google search turned up many results saying to replace the pressure converter. I was not able to find decent instructions on how to actually get this sensor off, specifically how this sensor attaches to the car. After spending a few hours figuring it out, I decided I would post what I learned.
Thanks for this thread. Courtesy of "other issues" I've popped my intake manifold off more than once and I completely recognize this part. May be at the root of my chronic CCID-029 issues tethered to these two codes:

002C57 Charging pressure control, plausibility Pressure too low
002C91 Blow-off valve, mechanics: Suspicion that blow-off valve is jammed open

I changed the BOV (aka diverter valve aka recirculation valve) with no effect. Your post reinforces a suspicion I had that I should check out the pressure converter. That buzzing sound description was helpful too -- my car does that after shutoff, never occurred to me that it wasn't normal (bought the car used, and it's my first Mini).

Very much appreciated. Will advise as to whether my problem is ultimately fixed by replacing this part.
 
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Old 04-01-2018, 10:43 AM
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I guess you already checked your wastegate. It is one of the most common failures on these cars causing low boost codes. After changing all related turbo control hardware, (including vacuum lines and pressure converter) it ended being a faulty wastegate. New turbo and no more issues.
 
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Old 04-01-2018, 10:48 AM
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Originally Posted by S-2013 View Post
I guess you already checked your wastegate. It is one of the most common failures on these cars causing low boost codes. After changing all related turbo control hardware, (including vacuum lines and pressure converter) it ended being a faulty wastegate. New turbo and no more issues.
Ahhhhhh I had *not* checked that (yet). Guess that's up for checking as well then -- I've got an appointment at the dealer tomorrow so we'll kick the heck out of the thing. Thanks for this.
 
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Old 04-01-2018, 10:55 AM
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Question: Anybody got a recording of that "kazoo" sound so I can compare to my Mini?
 
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Old 04-02-2018, 06:20 PM
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Update: Wastegate is fine (we put a scope on it), pressure converter is fine. Vacuum is fine. Issue appears to be whatever is left "in the turbo itself" (other than the wastegate). At 146K miles my money says bearings. But not the pressure converter, so I'm dialing out so as not to thread hijack

Thanks all!
 
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Old 02-27-2019, 07:32 AM
TimBaleia
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Please help to understand

Can somebody please explain how the whole system is working including vacuum lines, pressure converter, blow off and waste gate. What is that black plastic box where vacuum lines are connected underneath intake vanos solenoid? Is it some sort of a catch can/filter?
mainly interested in pressure converter.

thank you.
 
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Old 02-27-2019, 07:44 AM
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Vacuum reservoir: It gets vacuum from the cam driven vacuum pump. It then feeds that vacuum to the boost controller which then goes to the wastegate vacuum motor. Just another point about that wastegate - it can appear to open and close just fine when scoping it through the 02 sensor opening. The actual wear is in the exhaust housing that allows too much lateral play at the pivot point.
 
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Old 02-27-2019, 08:05 AM
TimBaleia
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Originally Posted by S-2013 View Post
Vacuum reservoir: It gets vacuum from the cam driven vacuum pump. It then feeds that vacuum to the boost controller which then goes to the wastegate vacuum motor. Just another point about that wastegate - it can appear to open and close just fine when scoping it through the 02 sensor opening. The actual wear is in the exhaust housing that allows too much lateral play at the pivot point.
Basically brake booster vacuum pump creates vacuum and via vacuum line it goes to the vacuum control valve (on/off switch) that is controlled by ECU and in closed position usually. When on boost and lets off the gas pedal valve opens and creates vacuum in vacuum reservoir ( why reservoir is needed?) and from there via vacuum line waste gate solenoid is driven and waste gate dumps exhaust gasses the the downpipe. Correct?

Why reservoir is there? What it does?
Basically this preassure converter (boost sensor) determines amount of boost? (Controlled by ECU off course)
does it mean that air leak in this system can cause overboost?

Thank you.
 
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