Cooper (non S) Modifications specific to the MINI Cooper (R56).

Regular gas?

  #26  
Old 05-13-2011, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by dannyhavok View Post
Bingo. In this context it's about compression, not HP output.
So, ok, pardon my ignorance, but does my Justa have that compression ratio? (10.6:1)
 
  #27  
Old 05-13-2011, 03:20 PM
dannyhavok
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Originally Posted by GigglesMcMini View Post
So, ok, pardon my ignorance, but does my Justa have that compression ratio? (10.6:1)
Yes, as I understand, the compression ratio in the Cooper R50 is 10.6:1. According to the Googles, the R53 has a compression ratio of 8.3:1

I don't know if the R56's are any different.

Edit: A few links I found say the R56 Cooper has a ratio of 11.0:1, hopefully someone knowledgeable here will chime in
 

Last edited by dannyhavok; 05-13-2011 at 03:27 PM.
  #28  
Old 05-13-2011, 03:27 PM
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Originally Posted by dannyhavok View Post
Yes, as I understand, the compression ratio in the Cooper R50 is 10.6:1. According to the Googles, the R53 has a compression ratio of 8.3:1

I don't know if the R56's are any different.
Thanks for researching this, I have the R55 (Clubman) 2010.
 
  #29  
Old 05-13-2011, 03:29 PM
dannyhavok
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No problem. You should have the same compression ratio as the R56 Non-S. Give it the good Gas!
 
  #30  
Old 05-13-2011, 03:41 PM
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Awesome, thanks for putting up with me!!!
 
  #31  
Old 05-13-2011, 05:00 PM
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Your paying a little more up front will end up saving you a lot more in the long run.
 
  #32  
Old 05-14-2011, 05:30 AM
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Originally Posted by maxmini View Post
Your paying a little more up front will end up saving you a lot more in the long run.
Agree!
 
  #33  
Old 05-18-2011, 04:33 PM
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most turbos have a lower compression. Specs for 2011 JCW Clubman says 10:1 compression. Using higher octane gas than what is needed offers no benefit, and can cause issues with "coking" or carbon build up. Octane is added to fuel to resist detonation (so a high compression engine will not "fire" before it is supposed to). It makes no more power than regular gas. Bike guys have this conversation every 3-4 minutes... haha
 
  #34  
Old 05-18-2011, 06:32 PM
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Originally Posted by gr8fulferari View Post
most turbos have a lower compression. Specs for 2011 JCW Clubman says 10:1 compression. Using higher octane gas than what is needed offers no benefit, and can cause issues with "coking" or carbon build up. Octane is added to fuel to resist detonation (so a high compression engine will not "fire" before it is supposed to). It makes no more power than regular gas. Bike guys have this conversation every 3-4 minutes... haha
Are you trying to say that because turbo cars have lower compression pistons they don't need high octane gas?
Or are you specifically targeting the JCW model with it's "low" 10:1 compression pistons that it doesn't need the high octane stuff?


If the answer to either of those questions is "yes", please don't offer any more advice.
 
  #35  
Old 05-18-2011, 06:46 PM
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Octane isn't "added", Octane is what gasoline is, i.e. the chemical name of gasoline. 100 octane gasoline would be 100% iso-octane. But the gasoline we buy is really a blend of hydrocarbons that is mostly iso-octane and is blended to act like 87, 90 or 92 iso-octane, depending on where you are.

Dave
 
  #36  
Old 05-18-2011, 07:20 PM
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Originally Posted by DneprDave View Post
Octane isn't "added", Octane is what gasoline is, i.e. the chemical name of gasoline. 100 octane gasoline would be 100% iso-octane. But the gasoline we buy is really a blend of hydrocarbons that is mostly iso-octane and is blended to act like 87, 90 or 92 iso-octane, depending on where you are.

Dave
so is 110 octane 110% iso-octane?
 
  #37  
Old 05-18-2011, 07:35 PM
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Originally Posted by gr8fulferari View Post
most turbos have a lower compression. Specs for 2011 JCW Clubman says 10:1 compression. Using higher octane gas than what is needed offers no benefit, and can cause issues with "coking" or carbon build up. Octane is added to fuel to resist detonation (so a high compression engine will not "fire" before it is supposed to). It makes no more power than regular gas. Bike guys have this conversation every 3-4 minutes... haha
The problem is, the "10:1" and similar figures only describe the static compression ratio. The static CR is determined simply by things like bore, stroke, and combustion chamber volume.

But an engine's octane requirements are determined by the dynamic cylinder pressure during compression and combustion, and forced induction makes a huge difference in dynamic cylinder pressure.

If you have a naturally-aspirated engine with a 7:1 static compression ratio, you can probably safely run it on any crap gas that will burn. But take that same engine and attach a turbocharger running 25-30 psig of boost, and your fuel requirements will get real strict real fast, even though the static CR is still 7:1.

And 10:1 isn't "low compression" to begin with. If not for things like proper cooling, good combustion chamber design and aluminum cylinder heads, that kind of a ratio would probably require premium gas even without the turbocharger adding to the dynamic cylinder pressure.
 
  #38  
Old 05-18-2011, 10:36 PM
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Originally Posted by MotorMouth View Post
so is 110 octane 110% iso-octane?
I just knew some smartass would say something like that! OK, I'll go into a little more depth.

It is possible for an octane number to be higher than 100 because of the varying methods they use to calculate the octane number.

Octane is also a measurement of the resistance of a fuel to cause engine knock, or pre-ignition. You can add chemicals, methanol, ethanol, toluene, zylene, methyl tertiary butyl ether and tetra-ethyl lead to iso-octane that will push the resistance to pre-ignition to higher levels than just octane can provide, hence the possibility of higher numbers than 100 octane.


Dave
 
  #39  
Old 05-19-2011, 04:51 PM
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that's cool. My point was, using higher octane than needed offers no benefits. If the Mfr calls for 89, or 91, using 94 isn't better.
 
  #40  
Old 05-19-2011, 05:02 PM
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Use Premium

I have a 2007 MINI Cooper PW/PW. I used regular octane before and received a warning light on the dash. I had to bring it into the dealership for a look. We had to add octane to correct the problem. Don't buy less than premium. Your MINI will know the difference.
 
  #41  
Old 07-18-2018, 01:36 PM
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Buying used

I am buying a used 2007 Mini Cooper base, and was wondering if anyone knew how to tell if the previous
owner used 87?
and if they did will putting in 91 fix anything the 87 grade hindered?
thanks
 
  #42  
Old 07-24-2018, 07:08 PM
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Good question.. I don't think theres any way to tell what they ran in the car prior unless you're buying from the previous owner
I bought a 2013 R56 a couple months ago and I have been running premium in it ever since. But I bought it from a dealer so I have no Idea what was used in it for the previous 49000 miles.
 
  #43  
Old 11-05-2018, 11:06 AM
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I used 87 octane once, and I'll never do it again. It chugged like the MAF was bad.
 
  #44  
Old 03-04-2019, 04:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Joey D View Post
Do not run 87 octane in your Cooper, it'll run like crap. Really your are putting at the most 12 gallons in the car and that's if you area really empty. At $.20 more then regular, premium will cost you at most $2.40 more per fill up, that's nothing in the grand scheme of things. If money is that tight just skip a morning coffee or some other unneeded expense from your week.
Where I live (North East) Premium cost more like 50c more than regular so your looking at more like $6 per fill up. Depending on how much you drive it can add up. That said I use 91/93 but if I see that it's close to a $1 more ( happens sometime when traveling) run a tank of regular and not loose any sleep over it. I don't think it's a critical in the N12 as the turbo.
 
  #45  
Old 03-04-2019, 06:08 AM
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Just as important is to use top tier quality fuel, it won't have as much water & contaminants in it.
 
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