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Suspension Science, Setup, and Tuning

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Suspension Science, Setup, and Tuning

  #26  
Old 04-29-2019, 01:31 PM
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Thanks for sharing.
 
  #27  
Old 05-06-2019, 09:24 PM
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Found an article that does a nice job of explaining the basics. It's old, but matches everything newer that I have read.

https://grassrootsmotorsports.com/ar...load-transfer/
 
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  #28  
Old 05-07-2019, 04:42 AM
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Thanks for posting.

GrassRoots also published a great article on front camber for MINI Coopers. It was a testing of a R53 with different camber settings and what was “ideal”. I seem to remember that the lap times were at their minimum with camber somewhere between -3.0 and -3.5 deg. Above that, braking suffered and lap times started to go up.

The one thing that I don’t hear/read much about is increasing caster. Simply put, caster becomes camber as you turn the steering wheel and the R-Comps I tried suggested a preferred minimum camber and recommended as much caster as possible. Also, if you look at the steering geometry, as you turn the steering wheel and the strut housing rotates, the front wheels will loose camber. Not talking about body lean; just in a static situation. It is the caster designed into the suspension that counteracts this.

I have seen a few (one or 2) camber/caster plates for these cars, but there is not much. There is also a front lower control arm bushing that adds caster. A friend of mine who used to autocross his R53 (and did very well at it) tried these and loved them.

Is there anyone out there who has experience with changing caster?
 
  #29  
Old 05-07-2019, 02:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Eddie07S View Post
Thanks for posting.

GrassRoots also published a great article on front camber for MINI Coopers. It was a testing of a R53 with different camber settings and what was “ideal”. I seem to remember that the lap times were at their minimum with camber somewhere between -3.0 and -3.5 deg. Above that, braking suffered and lap times started to go up.

The one thing that I don’t hear/read much about is increasing caster. Simply put, caster becomes camber as you turn the steering wheel and the R-Comps I tried suggested a preferred minimum camber and recommended as much caster as possible. Also, if you look at the steering geometry, as you turn the steering wheel and the strut housing rotates, the front wheels will loose camber. Not talking about body lean; just in a static situation. It is the caster designed into the suspension that counteracts this.

I have seen a few (one or 2) camber/caster plates for these cars, but there is not much. There is also a front lower control arm bushing that adds caster. A friend of mine who used to autocross his R53 (and did very well at it) tried these and loved them.

Is there anyone out there who has experience with changing caster?
The race car has caster/camber plates. We increased caster to max (which I think was ~ 6 degrees) because we couldn't get more than 2.5 degrees of negative camber. And it works fine at the "club" tracks we frequent in Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana.

However, at CotA this past weekend which has long hard brake zones I had an issue with overheating the insides of the fronts. We ended up running the car with about 1.5 degrees of negative camber (so the tires are more level under hard braking which we think causes the overheating on the insides) and slightly less caster. We haven't figured everything out yet, but we take tire temps after every session.
 
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